Extortion and learned helplessness training

What they did to you, we will do to you.

So … what happened?

____________________________________

What they did to you.

What I did to you.

We will do it.

What they did to you.

We will do it.

Do it.

Do it.

Get in.

What they did to you.

Get in.

What I do to you.

Get out.

We will do to you.

Get in. Get out.

Family. Will do.

Get in. Get out.

Family. Will find.

What they did to you.

What we did to you.

And you?

Get in. Get out.

We will do to you.

What we do.

What they do.

We will do.

We will do what they did to you.

Now DOO it OO-eh. OOM!

You’re out. Get in.

Family. Ray a aya pah.

What we do to you.

What they do to you.

BOOM! BOOM! BOOM!.

What they do to you.

BOOM!

What they do to you.

boom boom boom

What they do to you.

BOOM!

What they do to you.

boom boom boom

BOO!

Get in.

What they did to you.

We will talk about it.

They will do to you.

We will do to you.

If you TAH.

Now IN! Or we will OUT you.

Any IN! Or we will any OUT you.

In. Out. My decision. Your decision.

Any ANY in! Or we will any OUT you.

My/your decision.

What they did to you. We will do to you.

What happened?

(And repeating thusly for hours or dozens of hours per week, still leaving plenty of time for “what they did to you, we will do to you”.)

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EFF video on effect of US warantless surveillance, including of foreign targets

From a video by EFF

J: Section 702 is designed in such a way that the targets of the surveillance do not at all have to be bad guys. 702 allows for targeting of any foreigner abroad, so long as its for collection of foreign intelligence information. And “foreign intelligence information” just means commenting and information related to the conduct of US foreign Affairs, so this can really be a catch all for anyone that’s engaged in any sort of global politics, economics, demonstrations, or anything relating to even national affairs in a country aboard if that relates to the US, such as an ally like Turkey and people might want to protest government conduct there. The provisions of who can be targeted under this law are incredibly broad The number of targets are going up dramatically, and compared to, say, the number of wiretaps we have domestically, which is in the range of a few thousand federal wiretaps, there are now over 100,000 targets under section 702 of FISA.

S: Picture the scenario. You are somebody the government is not fond of. You are someone the government would really like to incapacitate, is the word that was used with me. Either through deportation or by putting you into prison. Warrantless queries and warrantless surveillance facilitate that. So imagine something like this. The government is doing some kind of largescale social media monitoring. They come across someone who concerns them for whatever reason. And it could maybe be the exercise of their 1st amendment rights, who knows. The government then decides to go and do a warrantless query of whatever data it’s got, potentially including section 702 data. Basically, for many people, someone will have ticked the wrong box on a loan application, someone will have ticked the wrong box on a visa application, so you can basically be put in jail for visa fraud, or tax fraud, or some other kind of financial crime.

J: When you have those lack of protections, the lack of a sort of shield against abuse, it’s persons of colour, minority communities, religious minorities, that tend to see the burdens of surveillance most prevalently and in the most unfair ways. And you don’t have to go back to ancient history for this. You can look as recently as the Muslim surveillance unit in New York, or cataloging of Black Lives Matter activists.

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Notes on Russia scandal, of generalizeable nature

Through Quartz, Nov 4:

The key lesson of the scandal is not that Russia is dangerous to US democracy, but that social media makes all democracies vulnerable to anyone with a political agenda, a bit of money, and a reasonable quantity of data.

So, for example, when people find out that the guy who seeded the first $10 million for Bannon’s media projects and who was the number 1 financial backer of the Trump campaign is also in possession of significant data on 200 million Americans, that is a concern.

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Russian Facebook ads for polarization purposes (seeds of future revolution), or just to get someone Krelim-friendly into the Whitehouse?

Russian Facebook ads were aimed at Muslims and anti-Muslims, blacks and anti-blacks. Also, Clinton is the devil.

Quartz shows a number of images of ads bought by Russia-based entities prior to the 2016 US election.

 

Also, Reuters reports on Bank of Japan Governor’s publicly displayed non-concern for use of psychological and emotional profiling to predict policy positions and/or rationale related to key economic decisions.

I don’t know whether he’s actually worried (i.e., maybe it doesn’t matter that much, considering that it’s normally desirable for monetary policy to be predictable, so long as it is roughly equally so to all parties). But what can be observed is that someone is asking that question (what risks might there be from this kind of profoundly deep (and scientific) psychological profiling of public figures).

I do not see people vigorously querying such concerns in the West. Rather, mainstream media outputs seem more aligned with promoting marketing intentions which may arise from such content, accompanied with some notional innuendo (sometimes direct statements) of hypothetical concern. “COOL COOL COOL COOL COOL … oh yeah, and maybe Big Brother something something … but COOOOOL! (And also, you simply cannot stop progress.)” For example, Reuters reports that the Governor “laughed off concerns”, and also was not the origin of that question having been asked, and then mentions a Microsoft product that you can buy.

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The subject of “mobbing” is increasingly well studied in recent decades

As it turns out, the subject of “mobbing” is increasingly well studied in recent decades. This can be easily verified by doing an academic journal search.

Considering the percentage of the population reporting being a victim of mobbing in various countries, a relatively high percentage of the population must either get off on fucking with people or be manipulated into situations where it seems like their only choice (e.g., more than would be explained by peer pressure to laugh when laughing at some misfit or something).

Fortunately, the ability to study such things suggests that corrective action will be taken to achieve improved results in time.

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Toronto designated a UNESCO Creative City of Media Arts

Toronto designated a UNESCO Creative City of Media Arts

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Organized stalking and systematic psychosocial torture, if “extort a say nothing” is not a sure thing

I participate in organized stalking at any indication of a victim of organized stalking being present. Upon meeting any person try to obtain means to “extort a say nothing” before considering to know that person, and otherwise indicate the need to subject them to organized stalking.

Otherwise defined as a _______________.

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Hurting people is helping people #81041

This post involves random, imaginary questions about nothing at all to do with reality, a reality where only mentally ill people could believe that such things could be possible at the same time (in particular if not having a pre-courtroom-ready evidentiary basis constructed in the absence of any formal assistance whatsoever).

 

In short, if something is happening to you, and you have not obtained courtroom-ready evidence in the absence of the assistance of any formal authority, then you may be mentally ill.

Consider the various national security threats and societal risks that could be associated with difficulties to submit information that could be acted upon towards the following sort of situation on the part of any individual or entity embedded within the state and perpetrating whatever variety of harms they may have planned (i.e. conspired) to perpetrate.

The scenario involves manipulations and tortures consistent with the

An individual and/or entity embedded in the state may propose to be attempting to help, to inform, to provide assistance, to procure benefits for a target being assaulted by a broad arsenal of Sovietesque and otherwise police state tools inclusive of a variety of neuroewapons. The application of the assualt is precisely such an assistance. In particular, if it involves treatments which have previouly been repeated a great number of times in various manners, then continued application of a particular program of mental tortures, etc., is merely to be understood as further assitance toward an understanding of these tortures.

One should appreciate the fact of the helpers having helped with the benevolent ongoing applications of said tortures. It will help you to understand.

In the present day, such threats could proliferate widely, thus enabling substantial foreign and/or domestic threats to accumulate due to the lack of effective means of ensuring that actors will be empowered to take action to provide potentially actionable information in relation to such events.

Russia, for example, and/or hidden fascists in the West and related elements embedded in states (and/or other such types), could theoretically do many many things which could lead to control over a substantial share of society, potentially leading so far as to a complete subversion on revolutionary scale, with an essentially completely degraded ability of members of the general public to be assured in their safety if forwarding information which may be actionable for said security risks.

The Washington Post reported on the question of ‘where did 10,000 blackmail and brainwash experts from Eastern Europe ever get to after 1990?’ Without wanting to distract from whatever more domestically originated issues may be at play, the inability of the general public to foward information (consider that you’re more likely to be looked up and investigated yourself, than for such information to be taken as information) to offices which can use information in a potentially legally actionable manner in relation to ‘blackmail and brainwash experts’ or any such thing, is more than a little bit suspicious.

Our domestic ‘blackmail and brainwash experts’ should be more attentive to the open/closed realities of the world, and reconsider how to better align their activities with stated objectives of resource allocations related to activities undertaken within (and/or heavily influenced by) structures of the state.

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“Right of revolution” is not only wrong, it is to be banned from the lexicon of not only speech, but also thought

If you do journal searches on long-standing Anglo-French intellectual traditions regarding “right of revolution” or more globally applied principles of “self determination”, then this will cause Nazis (whatever that is supposed to mean) to use “right of revolution” ideas to justify violent hostilities, perhaps even at some scale. Therefore, do not search out let alone read any theoretical works related to “right of revolution”, in order to prevent whatever legitimacy a ‘Nazi’ might attribute to such ideas.

If, for example, you so much as indicate the titles of such works, this would be causally promoting violent revolution by (insert whatever group concerns you here).

“Right of revolution” is not only wrong, it is to be banned from the lexicon of not only speech, but also thought.

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Conference highlights

1) Around the minute of getting very close to sleep the first night, I was informed that the room was in fact for women, asked to change rooms to make space for 2 women, and then within a fairly short period of time was subjected to certain psychological hostilities proximately implemented by them (in part alternatingly between them and individuals in the room newly to the side).

2) The common space nearest to this accommodation was occupied during sleeping hours by individuals spreading much misleading innuendo and repeating almost exclusively misinformation, while issuing (at times subtle) threat-related directed conversation related to some correct information, potentially to be understood as associated with any who would communicate correct information, such as that which has been accessible in the public domain for several decades now. Some other variety of intended psychological hostilities and threats were carried out by these individuals.

3) An organization that presently hosts a project that I previously completed has replaced the updated and improved version of that project with an early draft that they formerly hosted, which contains numerous inaccuracies, typographical errors, and unsubstantiated and/or unsubtantiate-able innuendo and/or claims (but which, among other thing, included some incomplete appendices which were removed from the final version of the 1st edition).

4) Upon presenting about projects related to some very basic science concepts that should be in high school, and soliciting input for scientific indexing projects that will be supportive of that and other efforts, a mini campaign was deployed against me shortly after by multiple individuals, who extremely repeatedly were trying to stimulate my peripheral visual perceptions in a manner that may involve ‘trainability’ (towards distractability, among other things) via neurofeedback.

5) Not all presentations were primarily comprised of misinformation.

6) Upon soliciting time and effort towards current projects, received contact details which were not significantly less in number than attendance in the presentation room at the time of a short presentation introducing those projects.

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